Guest Post: Tips For Long Train Rides You Didn’t Know

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Tips For Long Train Rides You Didn’t Know

People who live in cities where “everyone” takes the train are often amused when they see a person who has no idea what a train ride is like. There are some of us who have never been on a train. There are even people who would have to drive to find a train. Below we will offer some tips that will help you if you happen to be new to train riding.

Luggage

A person new to trains is quickly identified by their luggage. They appear to think that once they board the train, they will need everything they need for the next year of their life. Then once seated, they try to chain their luggage to their body somehow, never thinking that they may need to use the restroom.

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Tip One

You need a good, waterproof bag on wheels, a backpack, and a money belt. Talk to the experts at Unibaggage to guide you through this. If you have these three essentials, you will not have to check your luggage. You can put it overhead, and you can use your backpack as a travel pillow.

Tip Two

This is what goes in your money belt:

  • Identification
  • A small amount of cash (enough for a taxi, hotel room, and meal)
  • Credit cards
  • Passport
  • Visa
  • Emergency medical cards
  • Emergency contact person’s name and phone number

Tip Three

In your backpack or suitcase have a copy of everything that is in your money belt. Copy the front and back of each card. This is so you have the correct information to stop your accounts from being compromised if your money belt is stolen or lost. This will help you get replacements quickly, as well.

Tip Four

Remember to pack smart. Take shoes that can be worn to a meeting or shopping. Those high heels may look great on you, but they take up valuable space and how many times are you going to wear them on your trip?

After you have packed. Put on the money belt, backpack, and grab the suitcase and put on the shoes you plan to wear to the airport and walk quickly around the block. This is what it will feel like on your trip. If you can walk around the block, fully loaded, you are ready. If not, you will know it, and you need to lighten the load.

Tip Five

If you take medication, do not keep it all in one bag. If you lose a bag, you need a back-up. It is not easy to get medication in a different country. Also, keep a copy of your prescription in your money belt.

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Manners

Train etiquette is a big deal. If you are sitting in an area where others are speaking in low tones, respect that. Don’t try to be a clown, don’t get too loud, and do not interrupt other people’s conversation. If you happen to be traveling on a day where there are empty seats, feel free to spread out. But when you see someone looking for a seat, move your stuff.

Never put your feet on the empty seat across from you and certainly not after removing your shoes. It is very rude. Do not eat loudly, talk with your mouth full, and do not bring tuna or egg salad on the train ride. No one wants to smell your lunch all day.

The most important thing is to relax and enjoy the ride. There are some beautiful places that are seen through train windows. Don’t waste your time being stressed out. Just be smart, be prepared, and have fun.

This is a guest post by Wendy Dessler. 

Wendy is a super-connector who helps businesses find their audience online through outreach, partnerships, and networking. She frequently writes about the latest advancements in digital marketing and focuses her efforts on developing customized blogger outreach plans depending on the industry and competition.

 

2 thoughts on “Guest Post: Tips For Long Train Rides You Didn’t Know

  1. Pingback: Monthly blog overview: January 2018 – the Red Phone Box travels

  2. Pingback: Five Reasons To Add South Africa To Your Bucket List – the Red Phone Box travels

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